Unleavened bread

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: Could one have a liturgy where people brought their own unleavened bread to church that would be consecrated by the priest though held by the people of God? == A: No, that would not fulfill the image of the liturgy presented in the liturgical books. There is indeed an ancient custom for people to bring bread and wine, as noted right in GIRM 73. But the point is for the people to offer their gifts, not to hold onto them, and to receive communion, not to feed themselves. Then there are other complications: How would the community supervise quality …

Reception of candidates

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: A quick question.  It states in the reception of candidates (RCIA #492, 586) that the priest uses the given formula for each candidate… it is not spoken over the entire group.Is there an option to do so, especially if there are a large # of candidates (or time is an issue)? == A: Because the approved English translation says that, it’s probably what it intended. But it never foresaw opposing conditions. FWIW, the Latin original of this ritual is completely in the singular. It envisions that the parish is receiving candidates one by one as each is ready, not in groups …

Confession and absolution

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: Thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom.  It means a lot to us. With this pandemic and so many changes being made, there has been a lot of creativity.  Some has been wonderful and we know some has been done when it probably shouldn’t have. Regarding Reconciliation, what is possible?  There have been ‘drive through’ but what about virtual.  Is ‘virtual’ reconciliation approved? Can a priest and penitent get together via one of the online platforms (Zoom, FaceTime, Duo, etc) with absolution being done and it is valid? I thought absolution had to be done in person.  But …

Communion Host Dispenser

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: I just saw a product posted by a Catholic Religious Store–it’s a “No Contact Communion Host Dispenser”. Is this really approved for use? tried to post a photo, but can’t. Thank you so much! May you stay safe and healthy.  May God bless you, Father, Son, & Holy Spirit.  Amen. == A: The ad shows a product that stacks communion wafers inside a see-through cylinder fixed onto hand-held mechanism with a trigger that the minister pulls in order to drop the hosts one by one into the outstretched hands of communicants. Is this approved for use? No. Absolutely not. …

Communion vessels

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: After communion ministers receive communion, may a deacon pick up the vessels from the altar and hand them to the ministers? Or can only a priest do that? == A: A deacon may help. The Norms for the Distribution and Reception of Holy Communion under Both Kinds in the Dioceses of the United States of America says this at #40: “After all eucharistic ministers have received Communion, the bishop or Priest celebrant reverently hands vessels containing the Body or the Blood of the Lord to the Deacons or extraordinary ministers who will assist with the distribution of Holy Communion. …

Martyrology

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: I am trying to identify the feast day for St. Dominic Savio who is the namesake for one of our district schools. I thought it to be the date of his death but others suggest a date in May or even October. I am wondering if you can bring some clarity to this subject. In Canada, is it March 9, March 10, May 6 or October 9? Or some other date that I don’t know about. We like to recognize our schools on the date of their patron’s feast day, hence the question.  By the way, I use your Pastoral …

Sponsor at Baptism

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: A deacon was asked to be sponsor at Baptism. I wonder if he can do so if he is the minister of the baptism? I heard two views on this, and so I ask for some clarity. One answer said he CAN be a sponsor provided he is not the minister of the baptism.Another answer I heard said that when a deacon (or priest) is the officiant and the sponsor, he designates a proxy for the godparent during the rite of baptism.So…which is the “good answer?” Moreover, another question…If someone is a catechumen, can he have one sponsor for baptism …

Eucharistic processions

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: Would you comment, please, on some of the “activities” which have gone on in the course of the current pandemic and quarantine.  I think I can handle “eucharistic processions,” with a priest and monstrance in the back of a pickup truck.  But what about priests going for helicopter rides with the monstrance?  Or blessing drive-by crowds, with the monstrance, while another priest stands by with a dog on a leash, sipping a cup of coffee. Just today there was a report – a glowing report – about a nun who was going to a recent protest, and decided to …

Reading of the names

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: Thank you for your availability to us. Normally, parishes read the names of  the confirmandi aloud as part of their presentation of students to the Bishop. Given the uniqueness of our current situation and the fact that our Bishop has given the indult to pastors to confirm, is this reading of the names still required? My thanks! == A: Here’s what the Rite of Confirmation says in #21, which envisions a bishop presiding: “The candidates for Confirmation are presented by the Pastor or another Priest, or by a Deacon, or even by a catechist, in accordance with the custom …

Prefaces

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: A confrere asked if it’s possible to use one of the Sunday’s prefaces on an ordinary weekday.  Another question – this one from me: Is is permissible to use a “proper” preface with one of the forms of the Euch Prayer V? I would think not. == A: I’ll say yes to Sunday prefaces on weekdays because of the way that GIRM 365b speaks about prefaces that go with Eucharistic Prayer II. That prayer is appropriate for weekdays, and may be used with “other Prefaces” – without excluding the ones for Sundays. Prayer V comes with four variations, each with its own preface. …