Prefaces

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: I have a question about the use of the proper Prefaces provided for the Eucharistic Prayers for Various Needs and Occasions (EPVN&O). Each of the four EPVN&Os has been provided with proper Prefaces unique to each EP. Yet, it is unclear whether or not the four EPVN&Os may be used with other Prefaces as we find with other Eucharistic Prayers having proper Prefaces (e.g., EPII, Reconciliation I and II). EPII and Reconciliation I and II all have notations in the Roman Missal  stating, “Although these Eucharistic Prayers have been provided with a proper Preface, they may also be used …

Self-publish

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: I’d like to self-publish my original songs I’ve written for Catholic liturgy. (Many are used at my parish, allowed by our diocese’s chancellor.) Can you help with these questions? Thank you, again! (And thanks, again, for Let Us Pray. I refer to it often.) == A: I don’t know of an approval process, but you could check back with your chancellor to see about getting local authorization from the diocese’s Censor Librorum. If you are using any copyrighted texts, such as ICEL’s ordinary of the Mass, then you need permission from the source.

Consecration

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: The word “consecration”…In both the liturgical, and devotional contexts – I’m not quite sure how to wrap my mind around what this term means. As you know, we removed this word from the ‘advancement’ of a man to the Order of bishop. Yet I have heard recent reference to select bishops present at such an ordination as “Co-consecrators”. I know of no other reference in the liturgical context, save for Consecration to a Life of Virginity. In the devotional world, use of this word seems to be more frequent, e.g., Third Order Carmelite Consecration to Mary – thus, a …

Eucharistic prayer at a wedding

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: Fr. Paul I appreciate your blog. My question is – A priest on two occasions has left out the entire second half of the Eucharistic prayer right after the consecration and gone right to the nuptial blessing at a wedding. How does this practice impact the validity of the mass and of the sacrament of matrimony?  Thank you again. == A: For questions of validity, please consult a canon lawyer. The priest may not omit the second half of the eucharistic prayer on any occasion. At a wedding he is to continue through the Lord’s Prayer and omit the …

Statue of Mary

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: At a parish church that I frequent, there is a statue of Our Lady on the Sanctuary (to the side and not close to the altar – it is a large sanctuary). It has been mentioned to me that the statue should not be there because liturgical principle dictate that the focus should be on the Eucharistic Sacrifice during Mass. I agree with the liturgical principle and understand the GIRM supports this in a few places: GIRM 289 “[Art] which nourishes faith and devotion and accords authentically with both the meaning and the purpose for which it is intended.” …

Masses for the Dead

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: Paul, let me begin by putting my question this way … Is there any provision in the Church’s Burial Rite for more than one Mass of Burial for anyone? I say this as I observe bereaved individuals delaying funeral arrangements for weeks/months after death…coupled with multiple locations in the life of the deceased – not to mention how families are spread out all over the country.  Add to this the custom(?) of Memorial Masses (celebrated without the presence of the deceased remains)  Month’s Mind, various anniversaries, etc. etc.   To me, the Mass of Christian Burial indicates the presence of …

Deacon Stole Updated

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: I remember a conversation I had when I was in the seminary with a seminarian from another diocese that his bishop will wear a deacon stole for the foot washing on Holy Thursday. The purpose being the connection of service with the diaconate and that every priest and bishop is still a deacon.  In a brief search I could not find anything on this. I’m wondering if you have any insight. Is this just for a bishop? Can priests do it? If so, would you even recommend doing it? Thanks for the help and for this wonderful blog! Blessings …

Concecration of altars

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: I have been reading a number of canonical texts and older legislation regarding the consecration of altars. I saw in some of these writings a passing reference to the practice of placing 3 grains of incense in the reliquary, along with the relics and parchment of authentication before it was sealed in wax.   Are you aware of the reason behind this practice of placing grains of incense with the relics?   == A: I ran across something like this while I was writing my book New Church, New Altar. https://litpress.org/Products/6659/New-Church-New-Altar I make a reference there to the 9th century Roman Ordo …

Collect addressed to Christ

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: Fr. Paul, I wondered if the opening words of the Collect for the Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of the Lord might actually be in error.  The prayer is addressed to God, but goes on to refer to the memorial of “your Passion”, and “your Body and Blood”.  Finally, the words at the end read “Who live and reign with God the Father”.  Although the Collect normally is directed to God the Father, and certainly we believe in the full divinity of Jesus and can refer to him as God, why didn’t the translators simply begin …

Non-liturgical prayer

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: Teachers in Catholic and public schools thankfully and skillfully design and lead a range of prayer services and rituals for students, including one for National Sorry Day and Reconciliation Week in Australia.  At times these occasions are liturgies.At other times they are prayerful moments, such as a weekly staffroom prayer. Please outline a simple check list for teachers, and others to ensure that what they they are designing and leading is actually liturgy, and not simply a prayer service or ritual celebration. For example, the Liturgy of the Hours is structured, public worship, in the name of the Catholic …