Order of Penance

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: With the new Order of Penance coming soon I have searched for something that gives a general overview of the “reform” and the reason for the “reform” of the Order of Penance explaining to the Catholic in the pew the rational for the “reform.”  There may not be literature that will jolt the everyday Catholic’s understanding of Penance—a whitewash job, but “convincing reasoning” as to why one ought to frequent the sacrament. As confessors we have not done all that good a job of instilling the why? of approaching the sacrament more than is happening in a large majority …

Prayers in the missal

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Your book on the Lectionary, Words Without Alloy, is the answer to my prayers. After reading several of your other books I always wondered if the deliberations behind the committee (Group 11) would ever be available to those of us who don’t read Italian. (To be a fly on the wall during those deliberations.) I hope you will write a book about the development of the prayers for Mass. I know some are very ancient. == A: Thanks. I hope you enjoy the lectionary book. Incidentally, the reports like the ones I reference from group 11 are not in Italian. …

Vestment color

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: GIRM #355a indicates that during lenten weekdays, if a saints’ optional memorial or commemoration is observed, the collect is taken from that celebration, while the remaining orations and readings are taken from the lenten weekday.  My question regards vestments color when such a celebration is observed.  I have seen some commentators state that violet is worn for the celebration of an optional memorial or commemoration during lent.  However, I cannot find any official reference that back’s this up. Can you point me in the right direction? == A: I don’t know where this may be stated. However, GIRM 347 …

Tenebrae service

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: A parish liturgist has been approached about offering a “Tenebrae service” on Wednesday night of Holy Week – and she has concerns about the appropriateness of doing so. As I understand it, Tenebrae was part of the canonical hours during Holy Week, which was suppressed in the 1955 revision of Holy Week. Therefore, it really is not part of our approved liturgical books any longer. It is also not mentioned in the Directory on Popular Piety. However, I see places offering this service, using a variety of texts. So my questions: Thanks! == A: Here are some previous blog posts: …

Bells at Mass

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Our parish began using bells again a few years ago but recently we have started hearing them at the epiclesis and priest’s Communion. We have also added more servers who cross themselves and beat their breasts at places other than the beginning and end of Mass and the Kyrie. They also bring candles out to the front of the altar during the Eucharistic Prayer and Communion or stand behind the priest and deacon during Communion with purificators. It seems rigid, unjoyful, and distracting. I’m not sure how to talk about this to the pastor. Our deacon doesn’t seem to like …

Receiving communion

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: A good example from a recent conversation has to do with the growing practice of having people receive communion as “we did in the old days” with everyone kneeling, a group at a time at the communion rail.    Can you point to the history of the (now) standard practice processing to the altar and receiving from the minister while standing?      I have to say I think there is beauty to both ways, but it seems like this is something that ought to be uniform and not be used to signify membership in one ideological camp or another.  == A: …

“Traditional” Mass

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: Often people talk about the Mass as experienced before Vatican II as the “traditional” Mass, the way it was for thousands of years before we changed it in the 1960s.   Clearly this is not the case.   Have you found any effective way to help people understand that the Council restored the rite—rather that basically watered things down.    == A: I’ve addressed many of the sources of the current Order of Mass in my book At the Supper of the Lamb. I also agree with a colleague of mine, who says that the real “traditional” Mass is the current …

Priest facing the assembly

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: What documents of the Council mandate or even talk about the priest facing the assembly during the celebration of Mass?    The nature of some the elements of the ritual—readings, preaching, dialogue, invitation to prayer—certainly suggest that set-up.   But where can specific discussion or even mandate of this be found?     I grew up in a culture where the Council was received with gratitude–and with wide acceptance.    Now  I find myself needing to explain context—and to explain that the Council was not all about change to “modernize” as a fad.     == A: The Council’s Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy does …

Mustum

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: A sacramental question. Could a celebrant begin using mustum at his Masses for himself, or would he need explicit permission from the bishop?  From the document I am reading, parishioners can simply make the request to a priest for this or low-gluten hosts, but I cannot tell if different for the celebrant. == A: Here are the norms from 2003, still in force:  https://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/documents/rc_con_cfaith_doc_20030724_pane-senza-glutine_en.html . You may recognize the name of the cardinal who signed them.

Ordination of a new Bishop

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: We are having the ordination of a new bishop soon. I was told we can insert additional names into Litany of Saints – his name is Patrick. He’s a religious and their founder is only “ranked” as Blessed – can his name be included in the litany? == A: The answer is, “I don’t know.” When I check the Ordo Cantus Missae, which has a comprehensive litany, they are all saints, but they include several Old Testament patriarchs and prophets. The Ordination of a bishop says that the list may be expanded with the names of “a Patron Saint, …