Instituted

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: If a person is instituted an acolyte in one diocese, are they an acolyte in other dioceses? == A: Yes, they are. The same applies to lectors. Such persons are not the same as the extraordinary ministers of holy communion and readers you commonly see in parishes. A lector and acolyte are instituted into their offices by a bishop. The institution is permanent and universal.

Deputing – corrected

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: Just a slight suggested modification to your answer on ‘deputing.’  You wrote that only bishops can institute an acolyte. I think the better word would be ‘Ordinary;’ my provincial instituted me an acolyte and a lector before my ordination. ==== A: Ooooh, you’re right. Either the bishop or the major superior of clerical institutes may institute lectors and acolytes. They may also preside for admission to candidacy for ordination. Thanks for catching this. ————————————————————– Q: You’ve used the expression “deputing” to describe someone who becomes an extraordinary minister of holy communion in their parish. Is that the same as …

Ministry Monday

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: Thanks again for your time last week. The Ministry Monday episode has now been released. You can listen in here:  https://www.ministrymonday.org/episodes/2021/1/10/137-pastoral-pandemic-considerations-for-2021-with-fr-paul-turner == A: Thank you for letting more people know about my blog. Followers, you will find information about blessing throats, Lent and Holy Week on this podcast episode.

Anniversary of a dedication

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: When our parish celebrates the solemnity of the anniversary of the dedication of our church, does it affect how I pray the liturgy of the hours that day? == A: My understanding is yes. That all the liturgies of that day pertain to the anniversary. You’ll find the texts in the commons.

Ars Celebrandi

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: I have almost all your books so I just ordered Ars Celebrandi a few minutes ago.  I realize that your book focuses on the liturgical ministry of priests.  The publicity from LitPress also focuses solely on priests. Nonetheless, would this book have any benefit for permanent deacons? Please advise.  Thanks. == A: Thanks for asking. Absolutely yes. It’s hard to write about priests at Mass without writing about deacons. You will learn a lot of helpful information.

Ashes on the forehead

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: How did the custom of signing ashes on the forehead for Ash Wednesday become dominant in English-speaking countries, while other places (like Rome) still typically sprinkle them on the head? Any sources you could point to would be helpful! == A: I don’t know the answer to this, and I’m not even sure how to research it. This much I can tell you: The previous English translations of the missal, the Sacramentary, said, “The priest then places ashes on those who come forward.” That is a good translation of what it said in Latin, and of what it still …

Sprinkling holy water

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: Is it against liturgical law for a priest to bless holy water but have a lay person do the sprinkling of the people for him? This would be in the case of a priest who has leg/knee problems with steps. == A: Personally, I see no problem with it, but I cannot defend it from the liturgical books. The rubrics at Mass presume that the priest sprinkles the people. Even when the sick receive communion at home or in a hospital, a priest sprinkles them with holy water, but not a layperson. When I was a kid, whenever we …

Laying of hands

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: Is it the case that in any sacramental situation that calls for the priest to lay hands on those who are receiving the sacrament, there’s a general understanding that, for large numbers of people (as at a confirmation), an extension of the priest’s hands over the group satisfies the requirement to lay hands? I’ve seen it done thusly many times at confirmation; also at Masses of Anointing; never at an ordination (although I’ve never been to an ordination where more than seven men are ordained, so I’d think that’s not a large enough number to justify the switch). Please …

Rabbi at a Catholic wedding

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: Is it possible to have a rabbi present at the Catholic wedding ceremony and to have them do some sort of blessing or prayer outside the ceremony?  This I believe is what a couple I have is hoping to do.  Thank you for your help. == A: My opinion is yes, a rabbi may take part—even during the ceremony. Here’s a quote from the Vatican’s ecumenical directory: “158. Upon request of the couple, the local Ordinary may permit the Catholic priest to invite the minister of the party of the other Church or ecclesial Community to participate in the …

Placing ashes

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: You recommend sprinkling ashes on the crown if the head.  Isn’t one of the purposes of the ashes an outward sign of repentance?  That kind of gets lost if we sprinkle on someone’s head.  And I don’t know that people will be open to that.  Is there anything to suggest a person couldn’t sign themselves with ashes?  If we made available a small amount of ashes is a very small cup that each person could pick up and administer their own ashes?  Thoughts? == A: Other countries have the custom of placing ashes on the crown of the head. The …