Invalid mass – updated

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q:  Recently I was embarrassed to discover at communion time that the liquid in the chalice tasted more water like than wine like; In fact there is a question whether both cruets had water in them (they are green colored and will be changed). I presume Mass was invalid even though there was a sensation of ‘wine’ when I consumed… but…? What implications are there given the host was consecrated, if it was? Could I have distributed the host alone? I suspect not. Thanks again Paul for your generosity and expertise! == A:  You probably had an invalid mass. It …

2nd reading on Ascension

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q:  Why is there a choice as to the second reading on the Feast of the Ascension between the first or fourth chapter of Ephesians? == A:  The first option is available each year of the cycle. Years B and C give alternatives.

Exsultet in Spanish

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q:  I recently heard a recording of someone singing the exsultet in Spanish and the thought came to mind. At the Easter Vigil in a multicultural parish can the exsultet be sung in two different languages, say different segments or is it to be sung in its entirety by one cantor. == A:  Guidelines for multicultural liturgies are on the usccb web site: http://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/sacred-art-and-music/multicultural-liturgies/index.cfm I would not advise a bilingual exsultet. It’s probably better to make the text available in written form in the other language, either in a handout or by projection.

Readings for children’s mass

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q:  I minister to a Catholic Primary school, 5-12 year old, 125 in total.  The school comes to a weekday mass fortnightly and participates at mass with approx. 16 other parishioners including some parents/carers. How much liberty exists to alter the Mass Readings including substituting and /or shortening the scripture. What are the implications for various liturgical seasons and other occasions? I appreciate the Ordo is a guide in this regard. I assume ad libitum days allow for greater flexibility. Teachers are conscientiously asking can they choose a reading/s that correspond with units of work/curriculum  being studied and thus strengthen …

Candidates and candles

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q:  In the past we have had the candidates each light a candle from the Easter candle as they make their full profession. That step does not appear in the Rite. Is it acceptable to do that? == A:  Candidates light a candle to renew their baptismal promises together with the entire congregation. I would not have them light their candle apart from that as part of their rite of reception. It could give the impression that their baptism really didn’t count.

Rite of Election

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q:  In our diocese, the number of catechumens who participate in the ROE is significantly smaller than the number of adults & children of catechetical age who are baptized at Easter.   We hold one ROE for the whole diocese. Our diocesan Faith Formation office strongly encourages attendance, but I’ve been told by a canon lawyer that we can not present the ROE as mandatory.   What happens if a catechumen does not attend the ROE, and thus is not formally admitted to Election? Many in this situation go on to be baptized at the Easter Vigil. I suspect we’re not alone …

Physical gestures by the people

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q: I continue to enjoy and learn from your posts,  articles and your books. Thank you! We have a question we are “debating” locally.   In some of our parishes, people have begun the habit of raising their hands quite high when the presider prays “Lift up your hearts”  at the dialogue at the beginning of the Eucharistic Prayer. We can find no directive on that in either the Roman Missal or the GIRM.  The rubrics seem to indicate that it is a presidential gesture and an invitation to prayer, not a direction about a physical gesture with our hands.  Others …

Double alleluia

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q:  Our local pastor told me that some liturgist told him that the double alleluia at the dismissal is optional during the entire Easter Season. I’ve never heard of this. Is he right? == A:  That liturgist is wrong. The double alleluia is added during the entire Octave of Easter and again at Pentecost and its Vigil. That’s it. See the Missal, #69 at the end of the Easter Vigil, #13 at the end of the Pentecost Vigil, and the end of the texts for the Pentecost mass. I don’t think anyone will be spending extra time in purgatory for …

Readings at Funerals

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q:  Question concerning funerals. My pastor said he heard that there are specific reading to be done at a funeral during Easter season that differ from those in the funeral book we all use. Can you give us clarification – we found nothing in the rubrics for the funeral book. == A:  Your pastor is correct. Look in the fourth volume of the Lectionary for Mass, starting at lectionary number 1012. You’ll see the first readings that come from the New Testament during the Season of Easter. No Old Testament readings should be read at funerals during Easter Time, following …

Marian piety

In Paul Turner's Blog by Paul Turner

Q:  To celebrate the Blessed Virgin Mary in her role as “Mother of the Church” every year on the Monday after Pentecost, as a way to foster Marian piety and the maternal sense of the Church. Do you have any text to recommend for the Mass celebration and also for the Liturgy of the Hours? == A:  This has all been provided by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops: http://www.usccb.org/about/divine-worship/liturgical-calendar/mother-of-the-church.cfm